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(''nibbāna'' in Pali: no-wind, cp. nivāta, as in the stop phrase "''nivāte padīpa'': lamp in no-wind, where lamp illuminates all around it clear and calm without flickering of shadows) is the goal of Buddhism, where one stills karma, sees dharma/Dharma, stays in unconditioned peace (nirvana) and unsurpassed awakening (''bodhi''), both aspects of one goal of Buddhism (Awakened Way). Often nirvana is interpreted as "blowing out" taking it ''nir-'' (prefix going out) plus ''vāņa'' (= ''vāta'': wind), in the sense of "blowing out passion," but etymologically it should mean "going out + blowing = start blowing." Sometimes Sanskritization of Pali words are wrong (ex. ''pahāņa'' into ''pra=hāna'':abolition, correctly ''pradhāna'': application or effort, ''dǐpa''" into ''pradīpa'': lamp, correctly ''dvīpa': island). ''Nibbāna'' is better interpreted as ''nis-'' or ''nih-'' (prefix, no) as in the case of ''ni-vāta''.
 
(''nibbāna'' in Pali: no-wind, cp. nivāta, as in the stop phrase "''nivāte padīpa'': lamp in no-wind, where lamp illuminates all around it clear and calm without flickering of shadows) is the goal of Buddhism, where one stills karma, sees dharma/Dharma, stays in unconditioned peace (nirvana) and unsurpassed awakening (''bodhi''), both aspects of one goal of Buddhism (Awakened Way). Often nirvana is interpreted as "blowing out" taking it ''nir-'' (prefix going out) plus ''vāņa'' (= ''vāta'': wind), in the sense of "blowing out passion," but etymologically it should mean "going out + blowing = start blowing." Sometimes Sanskritization of Pali words are wrong (ex. ''pahāņa'' into ''pra=hāna'':abolition, correctly ''pradhāna'': application or effort, ''dǐpa''" into ''pradīpa'': lamp, correctly ''dvīpa': island). ''Nibbāna'' is better interpreted as ''nis-'' or ''nih-'' (prefix, no) as in the case of ''ni-vāta''.
 
Buddha's passing away was called ''pari-nibbāna'' (complete ''nibbāna,'' cessation of the five aggregates). It seems the two kinds of ''nibbāna'' was distinguished: one called ''an-upādisesa-nibbāna'' (without-remainder or non-remainder nirvana, same as ''pari-nibbāna'') and another called ''sa-upādisesa-nibbāna'' (with-remainder or remainder nirvana). Here ''upādi-sesa'' is the fuel/base/body-remainder or the five aggregates remainder. ''Upādāna'' (appropriation, ordinary meaning is fuel) in the Twelvefold Dependent Origination links, appropriation of the body becoming my body and taking the body my property or my body - called ''sat-kāya-diṭṭhi,'' body-possessing-view - like fuel approaching fire becomes fire).
 
 
Nirvana was often equated with ''nirodha'' (cessation) or ''a-sankhata'' (un-made, uncreated). ''Niroda'' can be ''a-nimitta'' (mark-less) ''nirodha,'' ''a-panihita'' (desire-less) ''nirodha,'' and ''suňňa'' (emptiness/voidness) ''nirodha.'' So, nirvana can be markless, desireless, and emptiness nirvana. 
 
   
 
Regarding "karma-wind" we find this word in Sino-Japanese tradition (but maybe not in Pali). However, when we understand the nature of karma, we know 'no-wind" is "no karma-wind" blowing us up and down from the fundamental force: "formationsas": ''sań-kāra'': total-karma from the past and present physical, verbal, and mental, originating perception/consciousness, feeling, name-form (five aggregates, suffering, and samsara, in the Twelvefold Dependent Co-origination or from the four stages of meditation (stilling physical, verbal, and mental karma: conception, emotion, volition (and perception)).
 
Regarding "karma-wind" we find this word in Sino-Japanese tradition (but maybe not in Pali). However, when we understand the nature of karma, we know 'no-wind" is "no karma-wind" blowing us up and down from the fundamental force: "formationsas": ''sań-kāra'': total-karma from the past and present physical, verbal, and mental, originating perception/consciousness, feeling, name-form (five aggregates, suffering, and samsara, in the Twelvefold Dependent Co-origination or from the four stages of meditation (stilling physical, verbal, and mental karma: conception, emotion, volition (and perception)).

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